Science Lesson Plans

farm

Farm Animal Coverings
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Science

Kindergarten

The students will learn about the different coverings that farm animals have.  They will be able to identify feathers, hair, and fur.

Know the types of coverings farm animals have.

1.   Have animal samples of fur, feathers, and hair available for the students to touch and differentiate between.
2.   Make copies of a chart for students to categorize the animals into groups by identifying their coverings.

Charts for the students
Overhead of the chart
Overhead projector
Overhead marker
Samples of fur, feathers, and hair

1.   Lay out the samples of animal coverings and have the students feel and explore them.
2.    Have the students gather in a group on the floor and ask for their attention.
3.    Ask the students what they noticed about the objects they were toughing and exploring (the animal coverings).
4.    Explain to the students that those objects are animal coverings and that they are like the coverings on different farm animals.
5.    Ask the students if they can think of any other animals that have those types of coverings. List the animals into covering categories so that the whole class can see.
6.    Give the students the charts that show a picture of the different farm animals they are learning about and explain that they have to figure out what type of covering each animal has in order to check the appropriate box.
7.    Together as a class go through the chart and talk about farm animals to help him or her fill in their chart.
8.    Ask the students what kind of covering they have.

For a child that is blind,  explain to him or her what the animal covering that they are feeling looks like and allow them to feel them while the class is deciding what kinds of animals have those particular coverings.

Observe the students while throughout the lesson to assess whether or not they understand the concepts.  Use their charts as another tool to assess their learning.

Explain other types of coverings such as skin, scales, etc., that other kinds of animals have.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Name______________

Put a check in the box for what type of covering each animal has.

Animal
Feathers
      Fur 
    Hair 
Horse



cow



pig



sheep



chicken


 
 

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                                                      SCIENCE ACTIVITY
   

Farm Animals

Kindergarten

The students will categorize animals into two groups, farm animals and zoo animals.

The teacher must recognize where various animals are found. 


Gather pictures of various domestic and wild animals from the Internet or books.

Pictures of domestic and wild animals, FARM and ZOO labels for the children to wear, chart paper.

1.  Discuss with children the fact that people have different relationships with different animals. For example, because cows are tame, they can be kept on a farm, while tigers and other wild animals cannot.
2.  Ask children to think about the kinds of animals that can live on a farm and the kinds that may live in a zoo. You may want to discuss why some animals live on a farm (horses help farmers do work, cows give milk, hens lay eggs, etc.) and other animals may be kept in a zoo (they are wild and most people might not see and learn about them otherwise.)
3.  Then write Farm at the top of a piece of chart paper and Zoo at the top of another.
4.  Name each animal from the list below and ask children to tell you whether it lives on a farm or in a zoo. If you have a matching picture, hold it up as you say the animal's name. cow, tiger, lion, horse, hen, bear, rooster, giraffe, elephant, duck, rhinoceros (rhino), sheep, goat, hippopotamus (hippo), pig, kangaroo
5.  List the animals on the chart that the children indicate.
6.  If they are having trouble deciding where a particular animal should be listed, revisit your initial discussion about farm animals and zoo animals.
7.  Tell children that they will play an animal roundup game.
       a.  Divide the class into three groups: zookeepers, farmers, and animals.
       b.  Explain that some children are going to pretend to be animals that have wandered away from the zoo
            and the farm, so the children who are zookeepers and farmers must bring the animals back to their
            respective homes.
       c.  Designate one area of the classroom to be a farm and another to be the zoo.
       d.  Pass out the labels for the “FARM” and “ZOO” animals. 
       e.  Then have the farmers and zookeepers round up their animals.
       f.  Repeat the activity with new farmers and zookeepers.

If a child is visually impaired, have a tape or recording of the sounds each animal makes.  Then, when the children play the game, they can make the noises of the animals they are portraying.

In order to assess this activity, listen carefully while the students name what category each animal belongs too.  You could possibly take anecdotal notes while the activity is taking place in order to keep track of which students are comprehending the lesson. 

Categorize animals into different groups, such as animals that live on land, animals that live in water, animals that can fly, etc, or let children come up with their own ways of categorizing animals. Divide a bulletin board into two sections. Label one section Farm and create a barnyard background. On the other section, create a zoo background and label it Zoo. Then have children cut out or draw pictures of animals that can be displayed on the appropriate side of the bulletin board. For an outdoor activity, turn the animal roundup game into a game of tag. When a farmer or zookeeper tags an animal, the animal must go home to the farm or to the zoo (depending on where it belongs). Note: Farmers and zoo keepers can only tag animals that belong to them. If a farmer tags a zoo animal, for example, the animal remains free.

An Internet source could be helpful in obtaining pictures of the various farm and zoo animals.


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